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2 edition of diseases of infancy and childhood found in the catalog.

diseases of infancy and childhood

Holt, L. Emmett

diseases of infancy and childhood

for the use of students and practitioners of medicine.

by Holt, L. Emmett

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Published by Appleton in New York .
Written in English


Edition Notes

12

The Physical Object
Paginationv.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22170148M

Hence, too, the great utility of hot baths in all affections of the lungs or diseases of the skin; and the reason why exposure to cold or wet is, in nearly all cases, followed by tightness of the chest, sore throat, difficulty of breathing, and cough. If two large biscuits have been so treated, and the child is six or seven months old, beat up two eggs, sufficient sugar to properly sweeten it, and about a pint of skim milk. Here it is that the young and probably inexperienced mother may find our remarks not only an assistance but a comfort to her, in as far as, knowing the simplest and best system to adopt, she may be able to instruct another, and see that her directions are fully carried out. We may observe in this place, that an occasional change in the character of the food is highly desirable, both as regards the health and benefit of the child; and though the interruption should only last for a day, the change will be advantageous.

She will see that the babe is acutely affected by all that in any way influences her, and willingly curtail her own enjoyments, rather than see her infant rendered feverish, irritable, and uncomfortable. For the farinaceous food there are directions with each packet, containing instructions for the making; but, whatever the food employed is, enough should be made at once to last the day and night; at first, about a pint basinful, but, as the child advances, a quart will hardly be too much. As Nature has placed in the bosom of the mother the natural food of her offspring, it must be self-evident to every reflecting woman, that it becomes her duty to study, as far as lies in her power, to keep that reservoir of nourishment in as pure and invigorating a condition as possible; for she must remember that the quantity is no proof of the quality of this aliment. Your lecturer finds this persuasive.

The pseudomonads in an individual patient seem to evolve over the years, with changing patterns of virulence over the years Am. The object in this case, as in the previous one, is to dilate the lungs as quickly as possible, so that, by the sudden effect of a vigorous inspiration, the valve may be firmly closed, and the impure blood, losing this means of egress, be sent directly to the lungs. There is no particular period at which children cut their teeth, some being remarkably early, and others equally late. But though this is the general rule, it sometimes happens from causes it is unnecessary here to explain that the infant does not cry, or give utterance to any audible sounds, or if it does, they are so faint as scarcely to be distinguished as human accents, plainly indicating that life, as yet, to the new visitor, is neither a boon nor a blessing; the infant being, in fact, in a state of suspended or imperfect vitality,—a state of quasi existence, closely approximating the condition of a still-birth. It is injurious to the infant by allowing it, without control, to imbibe to distension a fluid sluggishly secreted and deficient in those vital principles which the want of mental energy, and of the sympathetic appeals of the child on the mother, so powerfully produce on the secreted nutriment, while the mother wakes in a state of clammy exhaustion, with giddiness, dimness of sight, nausea, loss of appetite, and a dull aching pain through the back and between the shoulders. Find more at www.


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Diseases of infancy and childhood book

Sometimes, however, the desired victory is not gained disease triumphs, and a young life is lost, leaving a blank in the domestic circle which cannot soon be filled.

That this subject may he better understood by the nurse and mother, and the reason of the constitutional disturbance that, to a greater or less degree, is experienced by all infants, may be made intelligible to those who have the care of children, we shall commence by giving a brief account of the formation of the teeth, the age at which they appear in the mouth, and the order in which they pierce the gums.

Hence the difficulty of breathing experienced after scalds or burns on the cuticle, the cough that follows the absorption of cold or damp by the skin, the oppressed and laborious breathing experienced by children in all eruptive diseases, while the rash is coming to the surface, and the hot, dry skin that always attends congestion of the lungs, and fever.

While in the bath, the friction along the spine is to be continued, and if the lungs still remain unexpended, while one person retains the child in an inclined position in the water, another should insert the pipe of a small pair of bellows into one nostril, and while the month is closed and the other nostril compressed on the pipe with the hand of the assistant, the lungs are to be slowly inflated by steady puffs of air from the bellows, the hand being removed from the mouth and nose after each inflation, and placed on the pit of the stomach, and by a steady pressure expelling it out again by the mouth.

We turn to the foetor and darkness that, in some obscure court, attend the robust brood who, coated in dirt, and with mud and refuse for playthings, live and thrive, and grow into manhood, and, in contrast to the pale face and flabby flesh of the aristocratic child, exhibit strength, vigour, and well-developed frames, and our belief in the potency of the life-giving elements of air, light, and cleanliness receives a shock that, at first sight, would appear fatal to the implied benefits of these, in reality, all-sufficient attributes of health and life.

When neither of these articles can be procured, put a few clear pieces of red cinder in a warming-pan, and extend the child in the same manner along the closed lid. Please contact us by email: cs bargainbookstores. These are often confused, and tend to get missed during classical pathology courses, and are discussed here.

Diseases Of Infancy And Childhood

As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Basil T. The operation will seldom require above a minute to effect, and less frequently demands a repetition.

When tops-and-bottoms or rusks are used, the quantity of the egg may be reduced, or altogether omitted. There is another evil attending the sleeping together of the mother and infant, which, as far as regards the latter, we consider quite as formidable, though not so immediate as the others, and is always followed by more or less of mischief to the mother.

We do not charge a restocking fee for returns. Where a woman feels she can eat any kind of food, without inconvenience or detriment, she should live during her suckling as she did before; but, as a general rule, we are bound to advise all mothers to abstain from such articles as pickles, fruits, cucumbers, and all acid and slowly digestible foods, unless they wish for restless nights and crying infants.

Should the mother have any reason to apprehend that the cause of inconvenience proceeds from the bladder—a not unfrequent source of pain,—the napkin is to be dipped in hot water, squeezed out, and immediately applied over the part, and repeated every eight or ten minutes, for several times in succession, either till the natural relief is afforded, or a cessation of pain allows of its discontinuance.

The stomach digests the food, and separates the nutriment—chyle—from the aliment, which it gives to the blood for the development of the frame; and the blood, which is understood by the term circulation, digests in its passage through the lungs the nutriment—chyle—to give it quantity and quality, and the oxygen from the air to give it vitality.

Of the lamp we need hardly speak, most mothers being acquainted with its operation: but to those to whom it is unknown we may observe, that the flame from the floating rushlight heats the water in the reservoir above, in which the covered pan that contains the food floats, keeping it at such a heat that, when thinned by milk, it will be of a temperature suitable for immediate use.

Happily, the reverse of this generally happens, and the agony of suspense - so exquisitely expressed by David, Who can tell whether God will be gracious unto' me, that the child may live - is relieved, and the child, just now so seriously ill, recovers, to make his parents happy, perhaps to accomplish a great Work, and to leave a name in which posterity will rejoice.

Our humanity, as well as our duty, calls upon us at once to abrogate and discountenance by every means in our power. It must be here observed that the stomach can only digest solids, for fluids, being incapable of that process, can only be absorbed; and without the result of digestion, animal, at least human life, could not exist.

The packets sold as farinaceous food are unquestionably the best aliment that can be given from the first to a baby, and may be continued, with the exception of an occasional change, without alteration of the material, till the child is able to take its regular meals of animal and vegetable food.

There is not, unfortunately, reversal of the brain damage that has already occurred. Having welcomed in its own existence, like the morning bird, with a shrill note of gladness, the infant ceases its cry, and, after a few short sobs, usually subsides into sleep or quietude.

Thus, should illness assail her, her milk fail, or any domestic cause abruptly cut off the natural supply, the child having been annealed to an artificial diet, its life might be safely carried on without seeking for a wet-nurse, and without the slightest danger to its system.

It is injurious to the infant by allowing it, without control, to imbibe to distension a fluid sluggishly secreted and deficient in those vital principles which the want of mental energy, and of the sympathetic appeals of the child on the mother, so powerfully produce on the secreted nutriment, while the mother wakes in a state of clammy exhaustion, with giddiness, dimness of sight, nausea, loss of appetite, and a dull aching pain through the back and between the shoulders.

In the other case, the infant is attacked at once with total insensibility and relaxation of the limbs, coldness of the body and suppressed breathing; the eyes, when open, being dilated, and presenting a dim glistening appearance; the infant appearing, for the moment, to be dead.

A little of this rennet, poured into a basin of warm milk, at once coagulates the greater part, and separates from it a quantity of thin liquor, called whey. The object of this double incision is to insure a retraction of the cut parts, and leave an open way for the tooth to start from—an advantage not to be obtained when only one incision is made; for unless the tooth immediately follows the lancing, the opening reunites, and the operation has to be repeated.texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection.

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Full text of "Diseases of infancy and childhood". From Louis Fischers' Diseases of Infancy and Childhood, Artificial respiration of infant.

The most gruesome inventions in history from the breaking wheel to the guilletine Here you can read about and look at pictures of old and rare books within a wide range of biomedical subjects.

Holt's Diseases of Infancy and Childhood Hardcover – January 1, by Holt, L. & Howland, H. (Author)Author: Holt, L. & Howland, H.

Diseases and Disorders in Infancy and Early Childhood

The Diseases of Infancy and Childhood [Henry Koplik] on sylvaindez.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it.

This work was reproduced from the original artifactAuthor: Henry Koplik. Jan 23,  · sylvaindez.com: Diseases of Infancy and Childhood: Their Dietetic, Hygienic, and Medical Treatment: A Text Book Designed for Practitioners and Students in Medicine (Hardback or Cased Book): Diseases of Infancy and Childhood: Their Dietetic, Hygienic, and Medical Treatment: A Text Book Designed for Practitioners and Students in Medicine.

Diseases of infancy and childhood. London, Oxford Univ. Press, (OCoLC) Online version: Parsons, Leonard Gregory, Sir, Diseases of infancy and childhood. London, Oxford Univ. Press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Leonard Gregory Parsons, Sir; Seymour Gilbert Barling.